Environmental Directory: Radio Interview on 2017 Edition

The 2017 Austin Environmental Directory is Now Available 11-16-2017

The 2017 Austin Environmental Directory is now available. It is meant as a user-friendly guide to readers for learning about environmental issues, for identifying and purchasing environmental products, and for becoming involved in environmental organizations. The print version is distributed free to the Austin area. The Directory is also on the Internet atwww. environmentaldirectory.info/.

Our Guest on Shades of Green was the editor Paul Robbins, a long-time environmental advocate in Austin, Texas since 1977.

Energy in the News: Utility Fixing Customer Assistance Program

Monday, September 25, 2017 by Jo Clifton, The Austin Monitor 

Last week, after City Council adopted the Fiscal Year 2017-18 budget, longtime Austin environmental advocate and Austin Energy critic Paul Robbins had something to celebrate. Robbins had been asking Council to reform Austin Energy’s Customer Assistance Program since 2014 and the new budget includes direction to do just that.

…Robbins discovered that several hundred customers on the program, called CAP, had pricey real estate holdings and were not necessarily the low-income people the program was intended to serve.

…Under the new rules adopted by Council, customers will be removed from the program if their home is valued at $250,000 or more and the household income is greater than 200 percent of the federal poverty level guidelines. In addition, CAP customers who own two or more properties within Austin Energy’s service territory and whose income is greater than 200 percent of the federal poverty guidelines will be considered ineligible.

Energy in the News: Other People’s Money?

Public Notice: Other People’s Money                                            Actually, it’s yours. Do you know where it’s going?                       NICK BARBARO, FRI., AUG. 4, 2017, The Austin Chronicle

Last week I wrote about The Austin Environmental Directory 2017-18, a ninth-edition resource recently released by utility and consumer watchdog Paul Robbins. This week Robbins is at it again, releasing another long-awaited follow-up report, titled Misguided Charity, charging that money from Austin Energy’s Customer Assist­ance Program (CAP) – those voluntary contributions that utility customers can make to defray costs for the needy, (*but also a percentage of every utility bill you pay) – is in some cases going instead to wealthy property owners, and to subsidize wasteful consumption.

In this new report, Robbins makes two major policy recommendations: First, that the program should “verify that customers who live in properties with high improvement values really do have low incomes. Council unanimously budgeted money for this in August of 2016 … This could be enacted in a matter of weeks.” Second, and perhaps even easier, would be for AE to eliminate the CAP discount for high-volume electricity users – specifically the fourth and fifth tiers of consumption. “This is just wrong!” Robbins said in a separate email. “The practice encourages waste, while at the same time depriving the average CAP participant of additional discount money.” He estimates this move alone could save the utility some $2 million a year, enough to “increase the average electric discount of $250 a year by about $60.”

Appendices include a “Parade of Homes” – photos and stats on luxury homes that were receiving the CAP discounts as of this January – plus a list of some 56 “CAP Customers With More Than $1 Million in Real Estate Assets.” The report is being distributed to Council and others today, Aug. 3, and will soon be available for download at www.environmentaldirectory.info.

Energy in the News: High-dollar homes still benefiting from utility discount    

Some high-dollar homes still benefiting from Austin Energy utility discount                                                                               Updated: Aug 03, 2017 02:30 PM CDT, Kylie McGivern, KXAN News

AUSTIN (KXAN) — As Austin Energy customers rack up those high energy costs this hot summer, they’re helping foot the bill for the city’s low-income utility discount. But KXAN discovered that the $16 million fund is also benefiting million-dollar homes.

It’s a problem KXAN first revealed back in 2014, after which, Austin Energy promised to fix the system meant for the people who need it most. KXAN asked what’s taking the utility so long to right this wrong.

For the past three years, KXAN has followed Paul Robbins’ work. In that time, the consumer advocate has spent countless hours trying to fix the Customer Assistance Program (CAP), what he calls a “broken program.”

New Environmental Directory: Dealing With a Surplus

Public Notice: Dealing With a Surplus                               BY NICK BARBARO, FRI., JULY 28, 2017, The Austin Chronicle

A different type of surplus lies at the heart of The Austin Environ­ment­al Directory 2017-18Paul Robbins‘ massive, sprawling labor of love, released last week in its ninth edition since 1995. Robbins has won multiple Chronicle “Best of Austin” Awards – both readers’ and critics’ – for his environmental and consumer activism over the years, and in this edition he lays out an extended, somewhat fragmented article “on how to create an electric grid based completely on clean energy.”

Calling for “strategy, not stridency” in the long-term shift to a truly renewable energy grid, Robbins warns against quick-fix solutions and “impractical dreams,” and centers much of his argument around the challenges posed by the intermittent nature of renewable energy (especially solar and wind), and hence the currently enormous cost of storing and transmitting that theoretically abundant energy. In the end, he sees some positive routes toward the goal, primarily in efficiencies among consumers and utilities, and in new technologies creating a smarter grid and more ways to store and dispatch energy.

There’s also a deep analysis of Austin Energy‘s proposed new gas plant, plus of course, a ton of useful local directory info and tips on food, water, energy, green building, watershed protection, networking, and so much more. The Directory is available at Half Price Books, Central Market North, Wheats­ville, and online at www.environmentaldirectory.info.

New Environmental Directory: Environmental directory includes so much more

Environmental directory includes so much more                    Thursday, July 13, 2017 by Jo Clifton, The Austin Monitor

 

The Austin Environmental Directory 2017-18 is on its way to 15,000 Austin households. This is the ninth iteration of the directory, which serves as a primer on a wide range of topics, including watershed protection, challenges to clean energy, natural gas and the environment, and the Austin Community Climate Plan. And it’s free to the public.

The book’s editor, Austin environmentalist and researcher Paul Robbins, has dedicated the last three years to working on a wide range of topics explored in the directory. In addition, he engaged a number of other experts and environmentalists to write about food and the environment, clean energy, green building and recycling. Numerous businesses, agencies and nonprofits have supported the publication through advertising.

The introduction to the book explains that the Austin Environmental Directory “is meant as a user-friendly guide to readers for learning about environmental issues, for identifying and purchasing environmental products, and for becoming involved in environmental organizations.”

Energy In the News: City Council nixes Austin Energy’s base rate hike

City Council nixes Austin Energy’s base rate hike, approves new rates

By Nolan Hicks – American-Statesman Staff

Posted: 3:17 p.m. Monday, Aug. 29, 2016

The Austin City Council unanimously approved Austin Energy’s bid to redo its residential electric rates Monday, after the city-owned utility dropped its controversial proposal to increase its base electric rate….

The base rate fight quickly became a battle over who would ultimately pick up the tab: millionaires living in energy-efficient downtown condos or poor families who don’t use much electricity simply because they can’t afford it.

 a review of yearly data from Austin Energy by local activist Paul Robbins found that on average — over 12 months — lower income meant lower energy use.

 

Seaholm project for sale, renewing debate over its public use

Austin’s Seaholm project for sale, renewing debate over its public use

Shonda Novak – American-StatesmanThursday, March 24, 2016


The developers of the high-profile Seaholm project in downtown Austin are seeking a buyer for the hub of office, retail and restaurant space — a move that has reawakened debate over what the public benefit has been from the redevelopment project.

A potential sale of the nearly completed project has sparked criticism from some observers who say that what was built doesn’t live up to the community’s desire — and a former Austin City Council’s vision — for a significant civic use for the former power plant building.

“I think the city gave away the crown jewels,” said Paul Robbins, a longtime Austin environmentalist, referring to Seaholm and other former city-owned properties nearby. “We gave away most of that land to private development and didn’t get a whole lot in return.”

 

Energy in the News: Low income program still benefiting million-dollar households

Low income program still benefiting million-dollar households

By: Kylie McGivernUpdated: Feb 25, 2016 05:36 PM CST

 

AUSTIN (KXAN) — A city program meant to provide utility bill discounts for those in need is still giving money to customers who live in million-dollar homes.

“There is only so much money that is dedicated to the poor people, so it needs to go to the right people for the right reason,” consumer advocate Paul Robbins said.

KXAN first sat down with Robbins and Austin Energy about the issue in December 2014. All this time later, “There are still mansions on the Customer Assistance Program,” Robbins said.

Energy in the News: Utility takes steps to fix discount program

Utility takes steps to fix Austin’s bill discount program


After utility activist Paul Robbins exposed problems in the city’s utility discount program, with residents of higher-value homes being enrolled in a program designed to help poor people, Austin Energy has tightened up its screening process.

Ronnie Mendoza, who runs the Customer Assistance Program, said the old way erred on the side of enrolling people who weren’t a perfect match. But that old system also made it possible to enroll people who weren’t really eligible.

Austin Energy plans to further tighten its enrollment process by no longer automatically enrolling people who have homes valued over $250,000 (not including land value). Gutierrez explained the utility will send letters to people who are no longer automatically enrolled due to high home values and invite them to contact the utility if they believe they are eligible. They plan to implement that change in mid-October.